Just in time for the long weekend, the cooler spring weather is coming to an end

You can dig up the t-shirts from the back of your dresser drawer: the crazy spring weather is probably behind us, says Environment Canada.

You can dig up the t-shirts from the back of your dresser drawer: the crazy spring weather is probably behind us, says Environment Canada.

The federal agency said temperatures are expected to hit the 20 degree mark this weekend and stay in the 1980s with intermittent sunshine and clouds throughout the next week in Greater Victoria and most of places around the island.

“We’ve been in a La Niña pattern that has brought cooler winter and spring temperatures for the past two years, and it’s been longer than last year,” said meteorologist Derek Lee. “Now we’re back to more seasonal temperatures.”

Lee said April and May have been the island’s coolest and wettest months for the past 10 years, but the trend is not unusual. He said the weather off the Pacific is often erratic in the spring, and warmer, more consistent temperatures often don’t arrive until high-pressure systems begin to set in in late June, July and August.

“All of the above is unpredictable in the spring,” he said. “Weather can be a mixed bag.”

Cooler temperatures – along with higher levels of rainfall – have delayed the planting season for gardeners and farmers. The trees were leafy late and the bees were reluctant to leave their hives to devote themselves to pollination.

Among the anomalies was this week’s windstorm, which reached speeds of between 92km/h in Victoria and over 100km/h in parts of the North Island, causing more than 160,000 power outages on the south coast and damage to infrastructure that British Columbia Hydro was still repairing on Friday.

Greater Victoria’s average temperature in April and May was about two degrees cooler than average, Lee said. And April was wet, with 55.4mm of rain, although that was well below the all-time high of 77.6mm recorded for the same month in 2013.

Environment Canada said several other records were broken.

Nanaimo had its wettest April on record, with 164.8 mm of precipitation, surpassing a total of 150.1 mm in 1937.

Campbell River experienced its third coldest April on record and set several new single-day records for temperature and precipitation, including some since 1967.

Qualicum Beach set several new standards for one-day overnight lows in April as the mercury plummeted to -5C in two days, breaking records from 1964 and 1970.

Courtenay-Comox and Nanaimo each recorded record rainfall on April 15, flooding previous marks set in 1978 and 2008, respectively.

dkloster@timescolonist.com